Customer Success Leader
Customer Success Leader

Episode · 1 year ago

Tips on Creating a Repeatable Onboarding Process w/ Lisa Fox

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

When you have as many different types of customers as Monday.com has, there needs to be some consistency in the onboarding process.

 

Monday.com Onboarding Team Manager, Lisa Fox, joins Eric in this episode to share how her team has created a repeatable onboarding process for customers. Plus, the two talk about… 

 

- Obstacles in the onboarding process and how to overcome them

 

- 3 phases for a successful onboarding

 

- Why every CS leader should have authenticity and empathy 

 

For more info, check out customersuccessleader.com or send a message to hello@flatfile.io.

 

To hear more interviews like this one, subscribe to Customer Success Leader on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

I've learned that. I think every organization sort of has to define for themselves what it means to be on board with their specific platform. Want to create delightful customer experiences. You're in the right place. Welcome to customer success leader, where you'll learn about the successes and struggles of leaders who are passionate about their craft. Trust me, you want to stick around. Here's your host, Eric Crane. Hey, welcome to the customer success leader podcast. I'm your host, Eric Crane, and I'm here with Lisa Fox, who's The onboarding team manager at mondaycom. Hey, Lesa, how you doing? I Eric. I'm doing well. Thanks. How are you? I can't complain too much.'re Just talking before about being fall, which is my favorite season. Very excited about fall flavors. That I can't say. I'm much of a coffee drinker, so no PSL's for me. Oh, I'm jealous of you. I'm currently trying to curb my coffee consumption because working from home has really up to it, I found. Yeah, I believe that, especially with the full control over the coffee maker right. Yeah, it's too...

...much control for someone like me. For a while I was just doing a full pot just to round it out, but I've cut down to about half of that. So making progress. So what's a badger like you doing in New York City? So I'm actually originally from the East Coast. I grew up in Connecticut but when I was in high school I was just looking at schools and I think my dad off handedly said Wisconsin would be a cool school to go to and I ended up visiting it and falling in love with it. So I spent some years in the Midwest but then I found my way back to New York a couple of years after school. Yeah, yeah, we might had a little bit of overlap there. I spent a few years in Madison and great place to live for sure. So tell me a little bit more about what she got going on in New York at Mondaycom. Yeah, so I'm currently the onboarding team manager at Mondaycom, and Mondaycom is collaborative platform where you can manage all of your company's workflows and processes in one place. So we sort of consider ourselves a work operating system and my team is helping our new customers on board onto the platform, so really understanding how they...

...can take their current workflow and really replace it in Monday to probably streamline it, make it a little better and faster and be able to collaborate with their teammates right there as well. Got It. So I typically ask how our guests to find customers success that I'd like to get a little bit more specific with you. Have you define on boarding? That's a great question. It's also sort of a million dollar question. I think I've learned that. I think every organization sort of has to define for themselves what it means to be on board with their specific platform. So what it means for my team is that were empowering our customers to understand how they can improve their own work, so taking whatever their existing process or workflow is and helping them understand how they can improve that in Monday through engaging with our team. Got It. And so, as you are going through the process of trying to get the customers to that point, how do you set up milestones are ensure that there's a repeatable motion to drive success within Monday? Yeah, it's a great question because...

...it really can depend on the customer. Since Monday is considered a work operating system. We have customers coming to us from completely different backgrounds. So one customer might be using Monday to build an event planning workflow for their marketing team. At the same time you might be working on a project to help sort of build a sprint workflow for development team within even the same company. So the challenge for us is definitely to sort of set up a repeatable milestone process. But what we found is we're always sort of working towards that first time to value. That sort of our primary goal right away and on boarding is to help the customer take that first workflow and get it set up. What I mean by that is making sure that they have a good structure within their Monday the product, making sure that that person knows how to use it and can explain it to their team effectively. So what we've sort of landed on as our definition of on board is that the couple of champions who are going to be using Monday in their organization know how to build a workflow in Monday...

...and can then roll that out to their team. So when do you see a failure to launch? So an inability for customers to reach that point of value? Like where do things go wrong in this process? Yeah, I find that sort of the first point that can, I guess, raise trouble and on boarding is if a customer doesn't have the right resources in place in order to start their onboarding. So what I mean by that is onboarding is really sort of a collaborative effort between my team at Monday and between the stakeholders from the customers end. So we really need to make sure that there are people in place from their end to one have the time to help. I always talk to my team about this. Whoever's doing the onboarding from the customers end has a full time job. On boarding is not their full time job. They're doing this as a project. So making sure that there are people on there and to have the time to commit to an onboarding and making sure that those people have a really solid understanding of the workflow that they're looking to build, that can just be a challenge off the bat to make sure that...

...we have the right people and time in place get it. That makes sense. So tell me about some of the ways in which you set up repeatability in terms of technology tools. So what are the ways which you're integrating technology into your process to make this more consistent and more likely that the customers going to reach that point of value. Yeah, that's a really timely question because it's something it's a challenge that we're actually working to solve right now, and what we're doing is we're creating our own sort of onboarding kit. When I started at Monday in June, the unboarding team was really new. We had just sort of started a couple of people in the role and prior every CSM had been on boarding their own customers. So it was really a new function at Monday. So for the past few months it had a lot less parameters, a lot less boundaries around it and it was really just individuals working really closely with customers to figure out what they needed and kind of help them get there. But, as you mentioned it, it's sort of a process that isn't scalable, so we've put in some more structure. So with this onboarding Kit, what we're trying to do is set it up in sort of a...

...phased approach so that a customer, presumably at the end of going through phase one of our kit, will have a really good understanding of how to think about building within Monday, at the end of phase two, they'll have a good understanding of how to improve that. So through automation through INTEGRATIONS, optimizing whatever they're building, and then the third phase of that is making sure that they're equipped with the right resources to roll it out to their team. So we're sort of taking those three components of what's crucial for a successful on boarding and using resources that we already have to help the customer sort of Guide through that journey. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. And do you have any kind of resources or guidance that you could share potentially, like we can link it in the notes here for other folks who are sort of responsible for building out this scalable onboarding emotion inside their organization? Yeah, absolutely, it's something that we're still working on, but I would definitely be happy to follow up once we have it all completed. That's great. Thank you. I love giving back to the audience here, so tell me a little bit...

...more. I mean, I'm a builder, right. I love building software and understanding how it can, you be used to solve problems, whereas technology failed you and all of this, like where do you feel like you're doing things manually that you feel like machines should be doing instead? Yeah, when I think about where technology has failed me, it's funny because it's not necessarily one huge thing, which I guess is a good problem to have. Definitely in my roles in customer success I can think of a million little ways, like a feature not working when you're showing it on a call, Wi fi cutting out during an Ebr. You know, your bi tool not working when you need to pull that data the last minute. But more holistically, I think for my team, and this is probably a common answer, but a single dashboard or maybe piece of technology that could really show us the health of an onboarding specifically. This is something that I think customer success leaders talk about a lot, but specifically for onboarding, it's a really unique segment because it's a timeline driven project, fairly short, but it's not necessarily like other professional services projects, and that it's fundamentally crucial to the customer and the business is...

...kind of successful partnership. So really understanding how these projects are going is really important. But it's right now something that really relies on us, and by US I mean me and my team, having conversations around how is this onboarding going? There's a lot of data that I can check in on to kind of see how many days it's been, how many milestones they've achieved, that kind of thing. But it still really relies on conversation to have a whole picture of how the project is going. So having something to tell me that would be amazing. Totally make sense and I appreciate the inspiration. For all the other builders out there related to this like there's definitely still a lot of need, especially in customer success, which is so rapidly evolving. is a crucial sort of segment of business here. I mean I would argue that customer success is really the key to having a SASS business. You need to ensure that your customers realize how you quickly, and when they don't, I can cause problems downstream. For sure. Absolutely it. Completely agree. We actually...

...recently are expanding the scope of our on boarding services. Within Monday, when I started, we were only on boarding a small segment of customers. As I mentioned, it was a new team sort of seeing for the first time what it's like to segment that out, but it was so successful immediately in the first few months that were already working towards expanding the scope of our services. So in the coming months will actually be taking every onboarding so that CSMS can really focus on moving their customers up the maturity curve and my team can focused on what we do best, which is really helping customers get started. I love it. So why did he get into customer success in the first place? Yeah, it's a great question. So, as you know, I went to school in Wisconsin. After school I really wasn't sure what I wanted to do. So my first job out of school is I manned for a set of twins. It was an amazing job. I loved it very much, but I couldn't do it forever. So I was really thinking about what I was interested and I knew I wanted to return to New York and I was really interested and excited by the burgeoning tech scene there. So I...

...started investigating the different types of roles that that tech companies hire for and I really immediately found a connection and customer success and and all of those roles I was seeing. I'd always enjoyed working with people, helping people. In fact, I was a tour guide in college and it was my favorite job I've ever had. So I really loved speaking with New People and kind of helping share information to help them make decisions. So when I would read job descriptions for CSM's I thought that that sounds a lot like me and like a job that I would love doing, and I recognized I might need a little experience first. So I first applied as an SDR and I was not a great SDR, but I also made really great connections. I worked really hard and demonstrated that I'd be a good asset to the CS team. So I pretty quickly pivoted into CS and then sort of stayed there and have been there ever since. Yeah, and I figure that Midwest Nice might have robbed off on you a little bit here to because it's definitely important to be able to build not only business relationships with our customers, but also just personal relationships to is...

...a big part of it. Oh, I completely agree. I'm sure this is not unique to me, but I know that when I'm hiring for someone or someone asks you know, what are the crucial skills for someone in this industry, empathy is always going to be in the top three. From me or most other C S leaders who I speak with. Just that ability to be able to really connect with someone and the desire to want to help them is such a crucial aspect of our work. Yeah, I couldn't agree more. I haven't been a CSM and haven't worked with many other CSM's, I will say that having someone who you can tell truly cares about you as a person and the challenges you're running into is one of the true differentiators one can have, especially inside of Customer Success Organization. Yeah, absolutely so we're gonna have one time here, but I like to ask closing questions the same across everyone who comes on this podcast, which is just what is the best piece of advice related to customer success you've ever gotten? Yeah, it's really just to be a real person. Might sound a little trite, but you know,...

...even especially in the current global climate, everyone is doing their best and it really just benefits both us and our customers to be real, authentic and empathetic people. I find that our success is kind of mutually to Penon on each other, between the company and the customer when it comes to customer success, and really recognizing that and working together as partners is what makes for those great relationships and success on both sides of the and tacity, empathy and then intimacy ultimately, is what you really want with your customers and that's a true foundation of a great relationship. Exactly right. Well, thank you so much, Lisa, for joining us again. Y'All, that was Lisa Fox, is on boarding team manager and Mondaycom I'm are crane, Co founders and CEO of flat file. Thank you for listening to this week's episode of Customer Success Leader. You depend on the fastest time to value for your customers, so why let data on board and sell you down? Stop emailing spreadsheets, creating...

CSP templates or setting up ATP transfers. Create collaborative, secure workspaces with your customers and their data, saving you time while providing a memorable onboarding experience. Oh and there's no code required. You can go to flat files IO CS leader to learn more and get started for free. Thank you so much for joining us for this episode. Customer Success leader is brought to you by flat file. If you're a fan of the show and want to help a share these conversations with others, leave us a rating on apple podcast. Just tap the number of stars you think the show deserves. That's it for today. Catch you in the next one.

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